LS1LT1 Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've converted my '95 lt1 to a carburetor. I'm not sure at this time what I need to do with the return steam line...route it to a "puke" tank, route back into the engine, etc. If it's the latter, how has anyone done that? Possibly other options that are out there.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I wasn't sure in doing as you suggested that the radiator pressure would force coolant back into the heads. Apparently, that hasn't been a problem with your method. (My understanding is that the line was designed to only contain steam).
 

· Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
By the time the steam line runs back through the throttle body, or directly back to the radiator, the steam has usually cooled back into liquid. With my radiator cap off, I can see the coolant returning in liquid form, with low pressure.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
I would think so. It is essentially what the factory did for LT1s. I grabbed a picture that shows where the steam pipe hose terminates into the radiator fill neck.
Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Automotive design Vehicle


You can see that textured hose go right to a nipple on the radiator neck. Only secured with a hose clamp.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
No. It is not connected to the overflow. It is connected directly to a fitting on the radiator fill neck.

If you look at the radiator cap, you will see two hose clamps. The lower hose clamp is for the steam pipe. It goes right to the radiator. The overflow is not involved in this.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
I have heard of people deleting the steam lines. As with most things, results varied wildly, with some people needing new engines, and others being just fine.

I have read some where on either this forum or others that the steam lines prevent a cavity of air from building up, and causing the rear cylinders to over heat. For my money, the system has worked well. and I have never felt the need to delete those steam pipes, and risk substandard cooling.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top