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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't want to ramble on forever so I'll try to make this short. Essentially I bought a roller firebird that came with the engine out of it and disassembled for pretty cheap. Problem is I've never built an engine in my life. I owned a 89 firebird before this and I've been working on cars for a couple years so I'm not completely lost but if someone could volunteer to take my inevitable mountain of questions and offer basic advice, kinda like a mentor, would be very grateful. I already have questions to ask so feel free to message me any time. Have a great day!
 

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Ask away, I'll try to answer your questions.

However, rebuilding an engine requires specialty tools that most back yard mechanics don't have. My suggestion would be to take the engine to a machine shop. Let them do the reboring & honing of cylinders. They will disassemble engine, clean it and do the required machine work.

They will replace cam bearings, order new oversized pistons & rings. Then recondition the connecting rods. They will clean & measure the crankshaft bearing surfaces to see if crank needs to be turned down & oversized bearing used. If crank is good, then new standard main & rod bearings can be used.

In case your willing to undertake the job yourself, here are some of the tools you'll need. Torque wrench, piston ring plyers, ring compressor, ridge reamer, honing tool, dial bore gauge with measurement down to 1 ten thousand of an inch.

You will also need an engine stand & a cherry picker or block & tackle to get engine trans assembly back in car.

To help you decide, go to following link where we have the 93-96 factory service manuals. Read the engine section & see if you have what it takes to do the job. www.mediafire.com/?40mfgeoe4ctti
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ask away, I'll try to answer your questions.

However, rebuilding an engine requires specialty tools that most back yard mechanics don't have. My suggestion would be to take the engine to a machine shop. Let them do the reboring & honing of cylinders. They will disassemble engine, clean it and do the required machine work.

They will replace cam bearings, order new oversized pistons & rings. Then recondition the connecting rods. They will clean & measure the crankshaft bearing surfaces to see if crank needs to be turned down & oversized bearing used. If crank is good, then new standard main & rod bearings can be used.

In case your willing to undertake the job yourself, here are some of the tools you'll need. Torque wrench, piston ring plyers, ring compressor, ridge reamer, honing tool, dial bore gauge with measurement down to 1 ten thousand of an inch.

You will also need an engine stand & a cherry picker or block & tackle to get engine trans assembly back in car.

To help you decide, go to following link where we have the 93-96 factory service manuals. Read the engine section & see if you have what it takes to do the job. www.mediafire.com/?40mfgeoe4ctti
I have already obtained a good portion of the bigger/ broader speciality tools, engine stand and hoist and the torque wrench. If you don't mind is there an easier way to converse with you? Perhaps phone number or social media platform? The chat rooms on these sites feel clunky to me. I greatly appreciate your offer and hope you're ready! haha I ask alot of things.
 

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I never give out my phone number. I don't belong to any social media platforms.

You'll have to continue to converse on this forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I never give out my phone number. I don't belong to any social media platforms.

You'll have to continue to converse on this forum.
That is understandable. My first question I have is that awhile ago, when I was first reading up on these engines, i read the factory intake manifold or throttle body was not the best design for some reason, could you tell me what that reason was? And the way around it? I only have had the time to start work now and I have forgotten the problem people stated
 

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mass produced parts are always a balancing act between the best performance & pinching pennies for a better bottom line of profit.

The flow through stock throttle body can be improved by polishing the ports for less turbulence. Larger aftermarket throttle bodies do not increase performance unless you get really wild with the performance parts.

Like the TB, the intake manifold is not worked to perfection. Ports can be enlarged and polished. Cylinder heads are another area where the bean counters win. GM doesn't work the ports and combustion chambers for maximum horse power & torque.

And don't forget the exhaust. The system is not made to get the best flow out of engine. So a good set of long tube headers, and a catback freeflow exhaust system works wonders.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'll add that stuff to my notes, thank you. A big question I have that I've never gotten a good answer for is how do you best protect a car from rust? I live in the northern part of the northwest and cars get eaten from the bottom up around here, what killed my last car really. And I want to avoid that preemptively. I've heard people go both ways on under coats and I'm definitely not a body guy so Idk how to get rid of the small spots that it has now, maybe body shop? To clarify my build goal is a daily driver that has a little kick ass, but reliability and the cars longevity are my top concerns. ( Im sorry if I reply slowly, work Is really busy right now)
 

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Best way to prevent your car from rusting is to buy a beater car to drive during the winter months. There is no sure way of preventing rust on roads that are salted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Best way to prevent your car from rusting is to buy a beater car to drive during the winter months. There is no sure way of preventing rust on roads that are salted.
OH I know there's no sure fire way to do anything, but I want to give it a fighting chance. I'm putting the block on a engine stand today, and advice on what bolts I'll need and the best way to do it?
 

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If your asking what bolts you need to hold engine to engine stand, you need to get the same diameter & thread pitch as bell housing bolts. Only somewhat longer.

I consulted the 4th gen parts book to try to get the size length, & thread pitch of trans mounting bolts. While the book shows most every other bolt on the car, GM neglected to show trans to engine mounting bolts.

So the best bet would be to take one of the trans to engine mounting bolts to a hard where store and have them size it. Add the length of the bolt holes on engine stand mounting flange to the length of trans to engine mounting bolts.

If I misunderstood your question let me know. And it would be helpful if you give year of car & engine going in. I ask because 96 and l97 lt1 use torque to yeald head bolts that can not ne used a 2nd time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If your asking what bolts you need to hold engine to engine stand, you need to get the same diameter & thread pitch as bell housing bolts. Only somewhat longer.

I consulted the 4th gen parts book to try to get the size length, & thread pitch of trans mounting bolts. While the book shows most every other bolt on the car, GM neglected to show trans to engine mounting bolts.

So the best bet would be to take one of the trans to engine mounting bolts to a hard where store and have them size it. Add the length of the bolt holes on engine stand mounting flange to the length of trans to engine mounting bolts.

If I misunderstood your question let me know. And it would be helpful if you give year of car & engine going in. I ask because 96 and l97 lt1 use torque to yeald head bolts that can not ne used a 2nd time.
I have made a course change and I'm waiting to get the block to a machine shop and back before mounting it and attaching the accessories. The car is a 93 firebird, the engine is a crate engine. The only information I know about it is that it is a long block. (supposedly, not sure how to check myself) I'm also looking at trying to figure out what to do about the transmission. It costs the same to buy a new one, at the places I looked, to get it rebuilt at the shops near me. There is so much stuff to do
 

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Be aware that most crate engines are 350 SBC. Your car should have the LT1 engine.

If you are trying to fit the SBC 350 into a 95 firebird, be advise that normal distributor will be a very tight fit. Because the cowl area on 4th gen firebird prevents removing the stand dist. You would need the short cap type dist.

If your shprt block is a LT1 ignore all I've written up to here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Be aware that most crate engines are 350 SBC. Your car should have the LT1 engine.

If you are trying to fit the SBC 350 into a 95 firebird, be advise that normal distributor will be a very tight fit. Because the cowl area on 4th gen firebird prevents removing the stand dist. You would need the short cap type dist.

If your shprt block is a LT1 ignore all I've written up to here.
How would I discern what engine it is? Measurements?
 

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If you did not find a big 350 cast into the block, it's a older type small block chevy engine. On the LT1, the 350 is big enough not to miss. And the 350 will be found in the middle area of block, not the bottom or top.

If your planing to install a SBC engine, in place of LT1, Your into a job that I believe is too complex for a beginner.

My advice would be to sell the SBC engine and buy a LT1.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
If you did not find a big 350 cast into the block, it's a older type small block chevy engine. On the LT1, the 350 is big enough not to miss. And the 350 will be found in the middle area of block, not the bottom or top.

If your planing to install a SBC engine, in place of LT1, Your into a job that I believe is too complex for a beginner.

My advice would be to sell the SBC engine and buy a LT1.
It has 327 cast into all 4 sides of the block but the casting number identified it as a 93 to 96 lt1.
 

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I thought the number was 350, but thinking about it 327 now sounds right.

So your starting with a genuine LT1 block.

Does the engine block have the gear assembly in it that's used to drive the water pump. This assembly is essential if you wish yo use the standard LT1 type water pump. You will also need the splined sleeve that connects wp drive to wp drive splines.

If you don't have these parts, they are hard to find. The solution would be to plug the hole in block for the gear assembly. And plug the hole in front timing cover where water pump splined sleeve goes. You would have to get an electric wp for your engine.

Here is a pic of gear assembly & splined shat .
Automotive tire Circuit component Font Auto part Technology
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
I thought the number was 350, but thinking about it 327 now sounds right.

So your starting with a genuine LT1 block.

Does the engine block have the gear assembly in it that's used to drive the water pump. This assembly is essential if you wish yo use the standard LT1 type water pump. You will also need the splined sleeve that connects wp drive to wp drive splines.

If you don't have these parts, they are hard to find. The solution would be to plug the hole in block for the gear assembly. And plug the hole in front timing cover where water pump splined sleeve goes. You would have to get an electric wp for your engine.
Could that part be attached to the water pump still? What hole does that go into in the block?
 

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I attached a pic of the gear assembly & splined shaft in my last post. . The gear assembly is on the top part of engine block, on the inside of block. If your long block has this, you'll see the splined shaft of the gear assembly sticking out of engine block where timing cover is.

The splined sleve is in the left part of pic. It attaches splines of gear assembly to splines of wp.
 
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