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Ole said:
Dang, i'm getting close to my car being due.

I have no problem with my computer passing. I just hope they don't look too hard for the cats. :eek:

x2...November, but I know I can pass the OBDII. From what I understand Delaware is pretty lenient. Watch them nail my butt!:devil:

Grims....can't help you there my friend. Dunno!
 

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Grims said:
Ah crap, that's going to be a mess to get OBD2 back in the car. Can I simply turn off the codes with LT1Edit?
i think so, but without the OBDII computer, their system won't read it, and then they would have to do a tail-pipe test.

*this is only my assumation, i don't know for sure*
 

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I can pass the tail pipe test by dumping some denatured alcohol down the tank, guess I have to get my OBDII comp back though.
 

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It makes the car run leaner and cleaner, the more you use the less emissions you produce. I don't know how much you can use before it becomes unsafe though.
 

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For ENGINE SWAPPING in California if you want to get the car certified and legal- they have 4 rules you must adhere to and then get the car inspected and certified by a state refere before you can take it to your local "smogcheck" station:

1- only a car engine can go into a car. can't put a truck engine in a car.

2- the engine must be the same year or newer than the car.

3- If it's a 50 state car, it requires a 50 state (aka california emissions equipped) engine.

4- Must retain and have functioning all smog equipement from the newer engine.

(also- if it's an OBDII swap- it needs the date link connector so they can plug their equipment into it)

To set up appointments/ get info you can call this number: 1-800-622-7733

-BV
 

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MS

No testing, and no visual inspection. At least not in the lower counties; Jackson, Harrison, Hancock, Pearl River, Stone and George. Most state inspection stations check the basics, lights, turn signals, horn, and VIN, although the actual list is much longer. The $5 barely covers the time to check these items.

If you have tinted windows watch out over 30% and you don't get a sticker (stations now have a tint meter they put up inside your widow ... if they can't read it you fail.) This is a new law as of 2006.

:usa:
 

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No testing, and no visual inspection. At least not in the lower counties; Jackson, Harrison, Hancock, Pearl River, Stone and George. Most state inspection stations check the basics, lights, turn signals, horn, and VIN, although the actual list is much longer. The $5 barely covers the time to check these items.

If you have tinted windows watch out over 30% and you don't get a sticker (stations now have a tint meter they put up inside your widow ... if they can't read it you fail.) This is a new law as of 2006.

:usa:
What if you just rolled the windows down and unplugged the switch? Just say the motors are out.
 

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i think so, but without the OBDII computer, their system won't read it, and then they would have to do a tail-pipe test.

*this is only my assumation, i don't know for sure*
Actually there was only a 1 yr grace period for tailpipe tests as a backup. Now, if your car is 96 or newer and they can't communicate with the PCM, you fail.
 

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What if you just rolled the windows down and unplugged the switch? Just say the motors are out.

Pretty good thinking there. Might have to give that a try. No problem with my car but the GF has a '05 350Z with factory tint that failed. She was told she has to remove the tint. She ended up going to the Nissan dealer to get rechecked and it failed again, but they gave her a sticker anyway, guess 'cos it was factory tint that is supposed to be legal.

:usa:
 

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GA

All 1996 and newer vehicles will receive a two-part inspection.

* An OBD test to check your vehicle’s emission control performance history.
* A fuel cap inspection to check for adequate seal.

Tailpipe TestIf an OBD test is unable to be performed on a vehicle, it may be necessary to perform a Two-Speed Idle test (TSI).

All 1995 and older model year vehicles will receive a four-part inspection:

* A visual inspection of the catalytic converter to check for tampering or removal.
* ASM2 or Accelerated Simulation Mode Test - A dual-mode test including a 25/25 test = 25 pounds of load at 25 MPH and a 50/15 test = 50 pounds of load at 15 MPH.
* A tailpipe exhaust emission test.
* A fuel cap inspection to check for adequate seal.

An inspector can reject a vehicle for testing if it is considered unsafe to test. If the test has already begun when the safety problem is detected, the inspector may charge the full price of the test.

This is only for the 13 counties around downtown Atlanta. Ex. Gwinnett, Dekalb, Fulton, etc.
 

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repost from another section for Delaware:

So I pull into the inspection lane, and the guy says registration please and proceeds to instruct me on what he'll be doing while shoving the wand up my tailpipe. I asked
PHP Code:
"don't you guys do an OBDII scan?"

He responded, only if we need to.....so WTF, that meant, I had no idea, but thought I had best let it alone. He checks my wipers, headlights, turn signals, brake light and horn and then returns to his booth. Gives me the computer printout, and says pull up to the next station.

This guys asks for registration and license and proceeds to perform a weight/brake test. He says OK, and I see the braking computer display where it pulls slight left front. This inspection station was totally state-of-the-art, and afterwards pulled up to a "bank window" system. She asks for inspection sheet, $40, insurance card, and license.

In less than 10 minutes, I was FINISHED. Emissions results were no where close to being illegal.
 

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357 MAG had something on Arizona that interested me. I had been checking into Arizona intensely because we plan on moving out their within the next year or so. Emissions is a big pet pieve of mine to say the least, never had to do it here in Ohio and don't plan on starting.
Because of this, we are looking at staying out of maricopa and pima counties. If it means I have to drive farther thats fine. We have been concentrating our efforts up in the Prescott Area and Chino valley because Yavapai county currently does not have e-check.
What caught my attention with 357mag's post was half way through the list, it mentions of emissions checks being implimented if the population reaches 350,000 or more for a specific area.
I know from dealing with realestate that Prescott is growing very fast. Does this mean that possibly emissions testing could be implemented in other counties in Arizona as well?
As you can see from my sig I have a fair amount of cars to move accross country, most are modified, even my daily drivers. I have collector insurance on all of them but my daily drivers so that pretty much exempts them from being tested according to Arizona e-check laws. But I am not interested in testing even the daily drivers. I don't care for any of this bologne but thats another subject.

Could you give me anymore insight about Arizona testing? Anything been on the news or voting ballets lately? Word of mouth? Just wondering if more counties will be affected in the near future which may affect my moving their. Anyone from Arizona that can give inside details? Thanks, Larry.
 

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Information used in California

DISCLAIMER - The opinions expressed below are just that, OPINIONS, and are worth every penny you paid for them.
Use any of the included information at your own descretion and risk.


Through a long and painful process this is what I have learned about California emissions testing and a few things to do that will help get a car certified.

First here is the link to the California Air Resouce Board - (C.A.R.B.)
(I have another name for them but I know this is an all ages site - I will leave it up to your imaginations)
NOTE - This is a collection of all the rules & regulations not just laws concerning automobiles.
http://www.arb.ca.gov/html/lawsregs.htm


This site although geared to engine swaps has the best description of the smog inspection process that one would go through if you have after market parts installed.
http://www.jagsthatrun.com/Pages/Chevrolet_S-10_V-8_Smog.html


This site is the database of approved after market parts and their associated Executive Order numbers.
Executive Orders are issued for aftermarket parts that manufacturers have submitted for testing and that have been proven NOT to increase the emissions. Any aftermarket parts used in CA have to have a EO number or you will fail the inspection. This is where you find what parts you can use on your vehicle when building or modifying your car.
http://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/aftermkt/devices/amquery.php


This site is a listing of emissions standards in use for CA at this time.
http://159.145.15.175/ftp/pdfdocs/asm_ph43.pdf


This is C.A.R.B.'s Smog Faq...simple but slightly useful.
http://159.145.15.175/stdPage.asp?Body=/smogcheck/default.htm


This site allows you to check the smog test history for a particular vehicle using either the VIN or the license plate number. Handy if you are looking to purchase a used car. VIN lookup is usually best.
Personally I find it disturbing since it is another 'Big Brother' tactic of data collection, but handy none the less.
http://159.145.15.175/vehtests/pubtstqry.aspx


For those of you that still have not gotten your fill of laws this site will give you access to current California air pollution control laws.
http://www.arb.ca.gov/bluebook/bluebook.htm


Now for the list of things I found that helped get the car into the acceptable emissions range.

1. Most important make sure that the vehicle has no mechanical problems.

2. Change the oil before the smog check. The PCV system of your vehicle is designed to allow your engine to breath fumes located in oil compartments (oil pan, ect.). The fumes are then burned through the combustion process. Contaminated oils are high in Hydrocarbons and will present a rich mixture to the engine chambers(too much fuel). If the oil in your engine is contaminated, it may very well cause your vehicle to fail the inspection.

3. Right before testing make sure you drive long enough for the car to reach full operating temperature.

4. Use a good fuel additive. I have used "Guaranteed to Pass Emissions Test Formula (12 oz.)" for years. In my experience it will reduce the tested emissions levels by about 10 - 15%. If your vehicle is borderline failing this
will do the trick. You need to put the additive in the tank and then fill the tank. Drive the car over a period of days until you empty the tank. Then refill tank and go straight to the testing station.
You can obtain Guaranteed to Pass here >> http://www.autobarn.net/ch05063.html or from most major parts stores.
There are other good additives such as Blue Sky and PuraGas Emissions Test - Fuel catalyst (fuel additive) for gasoline.
I have no personal experience with either of these products, only the rantings and ravings of my friends.


5. Returned several areas of PCM programming back to factory settings.
(You did make a copy of these before tuning, didn't you??)
I have documented the settings and may be convinced to share these if asked politely.
I also have a original spec factory programming in LT1-edit file format that I can share.


Areas Changed
%Power Enrichment vs RPM adjustments
KNOCK RETARD MAX LIMIT vs MAP, non-PE - changes only in the 95 & 100 Kpa ranges - doubt this came into play during testing.
MAF vs Frequency calibration
KNOCK RETARD MAX LIMIT vs RPM in PE - changes only in 4000 rpm and above - again doubt this came into play during testing.
Spk Adv 400-4000 RPM - changes in the 1800 rpm and above ranges.

These changes brought all areas to extremely low readings, except the NO readings. NO was still too high to pass.

The final change was to the temperature the cooling fans turned on.
This snapped the NO readings to acceptable levels.
Instead of the normal 178 / 178 settings which keep the engine temp in the 180 - 185 area I set them to 226 / 235.
This allowed the engine temp to reach an average of 220 during idle and dyno testing.
A catalytic converter works best when it is hot.

Good luck and good testing.

Questions ???? Just ask.
As always I am open to giving my opinion to anyone who will listen.

Class dismissed.
 

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Oklahoma - No inspection, no emissions. Used to have it in Oklahoma City and Tulsa, but the inspection law ran out and wasnt renewed, so no more testing anywhere.
 

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In Nevada, you get the standard OBDII inspection, but you are allowed two not readies and they don't do a visual unless you are retesting after a failure.

OBD1 cars get the standard TSI test...
 
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In Virginia where I live, there not really to harsh on inspections. Just tires, brakes, brake lights, reverse lights, running lights, head lights, turn signals, horn, windshield wipers. No emissions BS here..... thank goodness!!!! :thumbsup:
 
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